Young farmers on an industry development scheme got the chance to meet leading MEPs and learn about the working of the European Parliament during a trip to Brussels.

 

The group of 17 is from the National Farmers' Union's Cereals Development Programme, comprising cereal and arable farmers in their 20s and early 30s who are seen as future leaders in the sector. They had lunch with prominent British members of the Parliament's Agriculture Committee, visited the hemicycle debating chamber and heard in detail how EU law is shaped by the key institutions the Parliament, EU Commission and Council of Ministers.

 

They were hosted by Anthea McIntyre, the West Midlands MEP and Conservative agriculture spokesman in Brussels, and also met MEPs James Nicholson (Northern Ireland), John Procter (Yorkshire and the Humber) and Julie Girling (South West).

 

Miss McIntyre took them through the different ways MEPs can influence new legislation and outlined some of her key projects - including her work to stave off a potential ban on the herbicide glyphosate. She also spoke of her campaign to promote enhanced use of technology in agriculture through methods such as robotics, precision spraying and gene editing.

 

Miss McIntyre said: "This important NFU programme is really about preparing young, bright, inquiring farmers to lead their industry into the future. It will help them to better understand the political process and how best to engage with policy-makers - and I was hugely impressed by their keen interest and their incisive questions.

 

"It was also useful for them to see how decisions in here in Brussels will continue to have an impact on UK farmers after Brexit."

The drive for better lawmaking in the European Union must continue even after Brexit.

That was the message when Anthea McIntyre, Conservative MEP for the West Midlands, addressed a meeting on better regulation organised in Brussels by the European Small Business Alliance (ESBA).

Miss McIntyre, Conservative employment spokesman in the European Parliament and Chairman of the European Conservatives and Reformists Group’s Policy Forum on Better-Regulation, said: "I have always championed the idea that businesses create jobs, not EU growth plans or regulation."

She outlined a policy report on her brainchild the EU Annual Burden Survey - a yearly stock-check of the impact of regulation on enterprise - and she presented a copy to Commission Vice President Franz Timmermans.

She praised Mr Timmermans's drive for better regulation and said she was pleased the survey (ABS) had been adopted. However, she warned: "The challenge for the institutions is to ensure that the ABS does not become a missed opportunity.

"Delivering legislation that works in practice is key to facilitating the growth and development of SMEs in Europe.
 
"While we may have created a simple piece of legislation at Union level which we believe is easy for businesses and especially SMEs to understand and comply with - how can we be sure that when it’s transposed into national legislation it remains like that?

"I am so grateful for the excellent help of ESBA, and in particular of Patrick Gibbels, in producing a policy paper setting out how the Annual Burden Survey could be used to draw comparisons, on an annual basis, on the way individual pieces of legislation have been transposed at the national level by each member state.

"The Annual Burden Survey as set out in the policy paper will help identify cases of unnecessary gold-plating in Member States. I believe that by bringing such transparency to the legislative process - we can ensure that legislation remains simple, clear and enforceable for our SMEs."
 
Mr Timmermans echoed Miss McIntyre's call for continued progress. He cited movement toward better regulation as an achievement of the current Commission - but said it must continue with the next.

"We have not reached the point of no return. What we have gained could still be lost so we must continue to press ahead," he said.



New rules to stop EU supermarket giants squeezing suppliers will continue to protect UK farmers and growers after Brexit, a leading MEP has predicted.

Anthea McIntyre, Conservative agriculture spokesman in Brussels, welcomed agreement between the European institutions on a new directive to curb unfair trading practices in business-to-business relationships in the agriculture and food supply chain, which was confirmed by the parliament’s Agriculture Committee on Wednesday.

The deal was reached just before Christmas following intensive talks between the European Parliament, Council and Commission, with Miss McIntyre closely involved as negotiator for the parliament's cross-national European Conservative and Reformists group of MEPs.

During the drafting process Miss McIntyre, Conservative MEP for the West Midlands, persuasively encouraged EU legislators to follow the model of the UK’s Groceries Supply Code of Practice (GSCOP) which protects farmers in their dealings with the top 12 biggest supermarkets.

She told the committee: “I have been proud to see the commission and the parliament use the UK’s Code of Practice GSCOP as one of the bases for this legislation. The EU has recognised the UK as a good example and a leader in combatting unfair trading practices.

“The Directive will protect suppliers with a turnover of up to €350 million from buyers who are substantially larger than they are. I believe this will cover all the Producer Organisations (POs) in the UK.

“Most importantly, the Directive covers suppliers who are outside the EU supplying buyers inside the EU. This ensures that even when the UK leaves the EU our farmers and growers will be protected when trading with our European partners."

The Directive represents a minimum harmonisation, which means that member states may go further to protect their farmers and growers if they choose.

In its detail, it groups all suppliers and retailers into six categories according to their turnover in euros from 0 to 2 million,  2-10 million, 10-50 million, 50-150 million, 150-350 million, and 350 million upwards). Each supplier will be protected in the event that its buyer falls into a higher turnover category.

The unfair trading practices that are outlawed are:
1. The non-respect of a 60-day payment term for non-perishable products;
2. Payment for services not provided;
3. Buyer refusal to provide a written contract on request.
4. Misuse of supplier’s confidential information by the buyer;
5. Commercial retaliation or even the threat of such retaliation if the supplier makes use of the rights guaranteed.

 6. Payment by the supplier for the examination of customer complaints which are not due to the negligence of the supplier.
7. Payment delays for perishable products (over 30 days);
8. Unilateral and retroactive changes to supply agreements;
9. Cancellation of orders for perishable products with short notice;
10. Payment for the deterioration of products already sold and delivered to the buyer.

The Directive also identifies “grey” practices which are prohibited unless they are agreed in a transparent manner and before the beginning of the supply agreement.

These are:
1. Transfer of advertising costs to the supplier, in addition to the transfer of costs for promotion and marketing proposed by the Commission;
2. Payments for the management of the product once it has been delivered.
3. Return of unsold products;
4. Payments to become a supplier or for the stocking, displaying or listing of products;
5. Payments for promotional costs; 

6. Payments for marketing costs.

Confidentiality of suppliers will be guaranteed after it was found that they were often discouraged from complaining due to fear of retaliation. It will also be possible for suppliers' organisations, representative organisations and NGOs to file a complaint on behalf of their members, further guaranteeing the anonymity of the complainant.
  
The European Commission will create a website through which information on individual national enforcement authorities will be clearly identified.

A no-deal Brexit  risks destroying the jobs miracle currently lifting the West Midlands and Britain.

That was the message today from Anthea McIntyre, Conservative employment spokesman in the European Parliament.

She spoke out as the latest monthly jobs figures showed employment at a record high of 32.48 million, up 3.43 million since 2010.

The figures also showed wages rising at their fastest pace in a decade and nearly a million disabled people entering work since 2013.

Miss McIntyre, Conservative MEP for the West Midlands, said: “This government is doing an amazing job of breaking down the barriers that keep people from

working.

“Here in the West Midlands, our strong manufacturing and export base has seen employment growing faster than anywhere in the U.K.

“But that could all be destroyed  if we crash out of The EU with a no-deal Brexit.

“That is why I encourage all MPs to really think about people’s jobs in the West Midlands and across Britain when they vote on the eventual withdrawal deal in the next few days or weeks.”

 


Conservative MEP Anthea McIntyre today condemned moves to re-open the decision to licence the world's most popular weedkiller for use in the European Union.

The European Parliament's Special Committee on Pesticides wants the issue to be reassessed just 12 months after Glyphosate was licensed for five years by EU member states. The call is among a raft of recommendations produced by the temporary committee aimed at overhauling pesticide licensing system.

Conservative Agriculture Spokesman Miss McIntyre, MEP for the West Midlands, said the proposal on Glyphosate was politically motivated, flew in the face of scientific evidence and would create further uncertainty for farmers.

She said: "The licence was renewed after Glyphosate was approved for use by both the European Food Safety Authority and the European Chemical Agency, bodies set up and funded by the EU precisely to provide this kind of expert advice.

"Casting doubt on its immediate future once again makes it difficult for farmers to plan ahead and risks calling the EU's regulatory procedures into disrepute."

It is estimated that banning Glyphosate would cut UK production of winter wheat and winter barley by 12% and oil seed rape by 10%, costing the farming industry £940m a year. Its use also lessens the need for mechanical ploughing, reducing pollution and soil erosion. No biological alternatives are expected to be commercially available in the near future.

Miss McIntyre welcomed several proposals in the report, such as the calls for greater transparency and non-animal tests on pesticides, but said on the whole it represented a missed opportunity to fine tune the existing approvals system, which is working well according to evidence presented to the committee.  Instead MEPs are proposing to take responsibilities away from member states and centralise much of the testing and approval process within the EU institutions and agencies.

She said: "There is absolutely nothing to suggest member states are less good at licensing products than the EU, and they are certainly more knowledgeable about local needs and conditions.

"Sadly this report is driven by partisan politics and lobby groups, not the best interests of consumers, the environment or the need to safeguard food production. At the same time it risks needlessly undermining confidence in the current licensing system.

"It could have been written the day after the committee was established as it ignores the bulk of expert evidence presented to it."

The committee's report has no legal authority but, if approved by the European Parliament in January, would inform future decision making on pesticides.